Saturday, December 10, 2005

Politicaly active students and grades

I can not understand the behavior of politcally active students who put all their times pursuing their goals of serving others while they forgot about their grades.

They should learn how to manage their time in order to serve the others as well as serving themselves while going on for their degrees. It is sad to see an aundergrade loving the Cs and crying later on when he face the facts of life and the employment filterings.

I was advicing some of my freinds today to put more efforts into managing their time and respecting the limitations of time. One of them astonished me when he said: "I love Cs" :)

Another one said I started with A+ then with A- and now I am surviving with some B :(

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I agree with your comments. There are too many activists at concordia who seem to care more about activism than academics. This is the biggest problem at concordia. As a serious student, I never understood how so many students had time to organize events (on the mezz) every single week. Do they not have any studying to do? I realised that some of these students have very poor grades and have been at concordia for 6+ years. I have not impressed! I know not all of the activists have bad grades, but my point still stands. I just wish some of these students would care more about the academics at concordia than middle east politics or Bush!

Bilal Abdul Kader said...

Thanks for your comment.

Caring for politics is part of the quality academic life in fact. However, students should know how to balance.

In the good old days, undergraduate students used to start their careers on their university desks. Now, on the other hand, they start their career on the Mezz but the field (politics) they like is too tight to accept everybody.

I hope that we will see new programs that support such initiatives and teach them how to manage their time efficiently as well.

Students staying for 6+ years in Concordia are encouraged by some employment vacancies that they can not find elsewhere. I think the university should limit these employment vacancies for efficient students who knows how to handle Studies, Activities and Student Work.

Anonymous said...

"In the good old days, undergraduate students used to start their careers on their university desks. Now, on the other hand, they start their career on the Mezz but the field (politics) they like is too tight to accept everybody."

I think those students who want to work in politics should concentrate on getting very good marks in relevant programs (like economics, communications or commerce). Like you said, there are not that many opportunities for careers in politics, and those who make it, tend to have strong academic backgrounds or extensive experience in industry or government. I think these concordia activistis, you should concentrate on learning about public policy and government, instead of telling others how they should live their lives and vote. If they want to be taken seriously, then they should act like serious students. What I find very disturbing about these activist students is their attitudes towards those who do not agree with their skewed vision of the world. They are not only disrespectful, but sometimes violent. In light of what I have seen over the years at concordia, I am starting to believe that these students are a liability for concordia and not an asset.

"I hope that we will see new programs that support such initiatives and teach them how to manage their time efficiently as well."

There are already a host of programs at Concordia to help these students organize their time and get their shit together. At some point, people at concordia will have to realise that some people are just not cut out for University. They are unmotivated, lazy or just do not like what they study.

In today's society, it seems that getting a University degree is a necessity, but it really isnt. Students enroll in University, knowing full well that they rather be somewhere else. Places like concordia simply become activist playgrounds; attracting students who simply want to have fun and play campus politics. In the end, these people create a hostile environment for students and faculty. Lets not forget the taxpayers. How would you feel if you knew that your taxpayer dollars were going towards funding the education of countless students who feel that they do not have to show up to class or study? I wouldnt feel too good about that.

Take care and good luck with your Ph.D studies.

Rasal Khan said...

thanks for post

Rasal Khan said...

great ones